No Pain, No Gain?

When we were told that our youngest daughter would have birth defects, possibly severe ones, did I need that situation to develop a sense of ruthless trust in God?

Would I have ever made Jesus the Lord and center of my life if I didn’t have a breakdown full of darkness, depression, and frustration?

Did I need to be cut from my high school basketball team to know that God can still value me despite personal disappointment and failure?

Did I need to be a lonely college student to take advantage of long stretches at a lake setting with just me and God?

Did my Dad have to die and my friend drink himself to death for me to learn to love God even when I don’t agree with how he has allowed things to happen?

Is pain and struggle a prerequisite for growth?

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Job, in the Bible, needed one catastrophe after another in order to finally make this statement about God, “My ears had heard of you, but now my eyes have seen you. Therefore, I despise myself and repent in dust and ashes.” Job’s struggles awakened his spiritual senses to truly appreciate and savor God.

Paul begged for God to remove his “thorn in the flesh” but God didn’t. Instead, God told him this, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Paul would then come to this realization, “That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong.”

Paul needed hardship and difficulties and weakness for God to be his strongest. I don’t know if I can say that I delight in struggles and disappointment just yet but if that is what it takes for God to be the strongest in my life then I will sacrifice my comfort and ease along the way.

For I have seen too much growth, too much of God’s presence, too much of God’s provision, and too much of a change in myself to think otherwise.

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Where What God Wants Done Is Done

God acts here among us. He moves, creates, shifts, directs, speaks, and transforms. He restores souls.

Do you believe this?

The place where God gets done what he wants done is called the Kingdom of God. Jesus announced the arrival of the Kingdom of God within himself at the beginning of his ministry and constantly taught his followers about the Kingdom of God.

He said the Kingdom of God is at hand. It is here, accessible, inhabiting, and available. All he ask of us is for us to repent. Surely, this means repent in the revivalists sense but also in the basic sense of “rethinking.” We are to rethink the way we look at the world because in Jesus the Kingdom is at hand, right here.

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Brooklyn Museum

If I have committed myself to Jesus, I have become “one in whom Christ dwells and delights.” I have access to this ever present Kingdom and can commit myself to what God wants done and join forces with other believers who are indwelt by Christ to expand and strengthen the Kingdom. I Grow Up and the community Grows Up.

But if my view of the Kingdom is that it is for another time and some other place then I will never experience its potential, power, and progress. I will be stuck as an observer and not a participant.

 

What We Care About May Not Matter That Much To Jesus

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Would it bother you if I told you that I listen to the Grateful Dead and a band called the Mother Hips? Would it matter if I tell you I don’t like Christian movies?

What is the first thing you think of when I tell you I would rather listen to NPR than Christian radio stations? That I follow some liberals on Twitter and have voted for Democrats on occasions? That I own a Subaru?

I tell you this not because I think I am cool (I know me and I am not cool) or because I think the people that make different choices than me are stupid or less sophisticated. I am not trying to shock anyone. I am not saying that I am right or better than anyone else.

What I am trying to do is point out the absurd tendency in humans to use cultural markers to categorize, identify, judge, and even dismiss. These cultural markers often have nothing to do with the emphasis that Jesus clearly stated for his followers.

Jesus said that if we are his children, we will obey his commands. What commands? You can start with the Sermon on the Mount. He later said that anyone who follows him must take up their cross and die to self. That is a demand much more costly than whether my kids watch Sponge Bob or not. He also said that the world will know his followers by how much they love. Wow, that takes work and humility and sacrifice and is hard to quantify to impress followers on Facebook.

I have expressed my problem with judgement here, so I am trying not to turn this into a finger pointing session. I simply think that the time has come for Christians to shift their focus away from superficial Christian subculture markers and who is in and who is out thinking and, instead, become obsessed with character transformation, spiritual growth, intimacy with God, and love, in the most Biblical sense.

You may not like my choice of music or politics but in the words of John Wesley, “If your heart beats in love for Jesus, then take my hand and we will walk together in fellowship.” And our focus will not be on categories of cultural adherence but on our love for God and others. If we work on that, then these other things will take care of themselves.

 

 

The One Thing The American Church Must Not Be Fueled By

Twelve years ago, I quit one of the great joys of my life. I had enough. I was disgusted and embarrassed and I felt hoodwinked, used, and deceived. So I quit.

Baseball, this great game that had captured my imagination and heart since I was in junior high, had become bloated, monstrous, and impure. Steroids had turned the game into a chemistry experiment and the players barely resembled their true selves. Worst of all, every sense of pure fascination and enjoyment I experienced as a fan became a fool’s errand because surely none of these players had achieved transcendence and great heights without taking a short cut, without cheating themselves and the game. So, I was done.

In the last few years, I have started to feel the same way about the American church. It seems to be taking short cuts and injecting itself with a substance that makes it swell and produce unusual results. This substance is fueling the church and has increased its power and significance. But this substance is anything but Godly, only serves to achieve results while corrupting the body with a toxin that looks just like the rest of the world and dismisses the purity of the Christ that it proclaims.

This artificial and harmful substance is anger. Somehow, anger has become accepted as a means for the church and its members to handle life in the 21st century. And it keeps holding on to it because it keeps getting results even though it reveals a heart that is corrupted, unchanged by Christ, and linked to false power, deceit, hate, lying, greed, and oppression. I don’t want any part of this acceptance and complicity with anger.

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Jesus was so against the use of anger that he described three different levels of punishment due the angry person. He says they are worthy of judgement, arrest, and even hell, simply on the basis of their anger. A wise man once said, “Anything that could be done with anger can be done better without it.” We may think that anger is the only way to get results and that we have to join the ways of the world to be significant in the world but all anger is doing to the church is poisoning any real value it might have; any real word it might bring that is loving, hopeful, merciful, faithful, gentle, kind, and peaceful.

Jesus continues his emphasis against anger in the passage referenced above by saying that our worship will lose its meaning and purity if we still harbor anger. He knew how anger corrupts and he makes quite an effort to get his followers to eradicate anger from their lips and from their lives.

I don’t want to quit the church or my affiliations to it but I will not participate in a steroid version that barely resembles Christ’s intent for it or turns it into a bloated, ugly, malformed entity. May we all assess our methods of fueling the body of Christ, the church, and end our love affair with anger. Christ will have nothing to do with it and we shouldn’t either.

Hearing God? Not Just For Super Christians

Does God speak to you?

If you are Growing Up into a wise and courageous follower of Christ, you should be surprised when God doesn’t speak to you. Dallas Willard, in his book Hearing God, quotes E. Stanley Jones, who says:

“He that made the toungue and gave us the power to communicate with one another, shall he not speak and communicate with us? I do not believe that God our father is a dumb, noncommunicative impersonality.”

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If Jones and Willard are to be believed than we should move God speaking to us out of the sensational category of spiritual experience.

What if our mature and Spirit-filled life with Christ is more like Samuel? He approached tasks in an ongoing conversation with God. Samuel didn’t always interpret situations and directions correctly but that didn’t stop God from continuing to speak to him. We too can hear from God and, in fact, we should expect to and not be surprised when we do.

God speaking may be a still, small voice or may be an audible one or be simply words that someone else speaks that seems to reach you from a depth only you recognize. The point is that it is not just Samuel or Moses or Elijah that hear from God but you and me. God is not checking our credentials.

As long as we are seeking him with all of our heart and mind, we will hear from God. He wants to speak to us as much as we want to hear from Him. Let’s start that conversation today.